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20130106
20130114
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. my question is on religion. how big of a role does religion play in the overall aspect of terrorism. how big of a r ole has it played in the u.s.'s policy on counterterrorism? >>the question is what is the role of religion either from the terrorist perspective or the combating counterterrorism perspective. from the terrorist perspective what we have mostly found is that adherence from al qaeda broadly misinterpreted and taken extremist views and perverted islam as a religion to be able to coerce and otherwise control their followers in doing things that are very much what the tenants of islam would say. we quoted a scholar and others that talked about the prohibition of killing innocent civilians. when they talk about the majority of people being killed by al qaeda are muslims contradicted the religion of islam and pointed out they were violating the tenet. so in general, helping to highlight the perversion of the religion in terms of the information we are doing has been helpful and that is what was done with the deadly vanguards report. it identified the problems that al qaeda wa
was put in there. remember, this is the second amendment, second only after free speech, religion. the founders took this very, very seriously. this is not an amendment to guarantee the right to hunt squirrels. so it's very important that we have an adult conversation, stop ranting and raving over gun violence. of course, we all hate gun violence. but for example, let us ask the question, why have we seen the mass shootings that we have? it is not the law-abiding citizens, using their guns. in fact, there is a very close connection with psychiatric drugs. i have a forbes column i wrote that should be appearing very soon, it draws the connection between the presence of these psychiatric drug, people -- those so-called lone wolf shooters, especially the young people who are on these psychiatric drugs, anti-depressants or in withdrawal from them, why isn't congress holding hearings on this? rather than pulling the nra do into these meetings and brow-beating them over exercising a right that the founders guaranteed, why not invite the pharmaceutical companies into capitol hill and see
.s. -- religious freedom. the role of religion and the narratives that the afghan taliban offering the pakistani taliban offer often couched in militant terms, does that play with the populations of taliban -- talibanistan and something that brings something closer to them or is it just political verbiage with a different addressing? >> answers have to be like 30 seconds please. sorry. we have got to wrap it up. >> in the case of police, the reason there was not investment and police in pakistan is because of sheer incompetence. of course that leads to lack of political will. i will also criticize the government as well as the pakistan government. in 2001 to 2008 the u.s. started looking at the police is an important institution. but why from 2001 to 2000 adobe's departments and organizations in the u.s. never talked about counterterrorism as a civil law issue. >> a good point. >> there are elements of the taliban who believe this is the right time to negotiate because they don't think that the '90s taliban will be reconstituted. there are others who disagree with that, but that is essentially w
where everybody sort of gets religion and says we're going to do it, but we're going to be on our way back. >> some positive signs. economic growth will probably pick up and a good chance we'll get comprehensive immigration reform in 2013, which would be good for any number of reasons. corporate tax reform. there seems to be bipartisan support for that. will we solve if you will the fiscal challenges of the year, no, we'll still be kicking cans down the road, use whatever cliches you want. there's a bit of momentum finally in the right direction. there's economic momentum in the u.s. that will reduce some of the political pressure. the u.s. isn't europe and a deal isn't as urgent and won't be until 2013, but i think a little less polarized than it has been in obama's first term. >> on that optimistic note, thank you, all. we look forward -- it's a good way to say happy 2013. we will be back. ...and down. just use your maxperks card and get a case of x-9 paper for only 1-cent after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. sfx- "sounds of african drum and fl
't think there is one blinding moment where everybody sort of gets religion and says we're going to do it, but we're on our way back. >> positive signs. economic growth will probably pick up and a good chance we'll get comprehensive immigration reform in 2013, which would be good for any number of reasons. corporate tax reform. there seems to be bipartisan support for that. we'll resolve, if you will, the fiscal challenges of the year? no. we'll kick cans down the road. use whatever cliche you want. a bit of momentum, finally, in the right direction. >> economic momentum in the u.s. that will reduce some of the political pressure. the u.s. isn't europe and a deal isn't as urgent and won't be until 2013, but i think a little less polarized than it has been in obama's first term. >> on that optimistic note, thank you, all. good way to say it, happy 2013. >>> we will be back. him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve
are hard-core religion. they are going to do what they want to do. if they wanted some kind of change, the people themselves would have fought just like our forefathers fought for our rights. host: more from the front page article in "the wall street journal." joseph from cincinnati, ohio on the line for republicans. caller: hello. how are you doing? i am glad to be able to comment. i think this is a very historic moment. i am proud of obama and karzai getting up there. we have to end the war some time. my thesis is if we have the talent than -- taliban, terrorism has to be fought all over the world. this is the message they are both saying. it is a long drawn out war. it has to end sometime. if we are pulling out a little sooner, there will be critics saying a lot of different things. i really pray and hope this is successful. the education i think is very important. host: jim from tennessee on the line for independents. caller: i watched the press conference between the two presidents. karzai and his government are one of the most corrupt governments ever. we have lost billions of d
of freedom of religion and separation of church and state. >> roger williams was the founder of rhode island, the founder of providence, and also a founder of the first baptist church in america. williams was going -- born in london. his birth records were burned up in the great london fire of 1666. he became a chaplain for one of the chiefs. because he was a puritan and the church was cracking down and putting his people in jail, he fled england. he arrived in boston in february. he believed the state had no role to play in religion. this was an absolutely radical idea at his time. every country in europe had a state church, so did massachusetts and the plymouth colony. they all had their own state- supported churches. the taxes of the people paid for the ministers and the buildings. you had to go to church or they would come and get you and fine you. williams said the state has no role whatsoever to play in religion. eventually, he was put on trial there and convicted of sedition and heresy and was going to be shipped back to england where he probably would have died. before they could exe
be by islam and the muslim religion, the second part i don't get at all. i mean shall the fact is, all this have nonsense we're not at war against terror. they're at war against us, it's not terror, it's extremists, muslims, who are at war with us. they actually declared war on us, so i don't know how he doesn't get the fact that there's a war going on. what the heck does he think happened in libya a couple of months ago? that's part of their efforts to try to kill us, to try to destroy us. they were at war with us when they attacked us on september 11th. they were at war with us when they killed our ambassador a few months ago. >> sean: here is the worst part. let me play this other cut here where he talks about jihad, using a legitimate term jihad. >> jihad is holy war, jihad is is terrorism. watch this one. >> president obama sees this as a fight against jihadists, describing terrorists in this way, jihad, purify ones self, risks giving these murderers in no way deserve. >> sean: is he going to be our new cia director? >> that much of an apologist, there's a legitimate interpretatio
and women. in india, this comes out of religion, out of caste, out of culture. the people who get elected are sometimes traditional leaders. they don't want to overturn these traditions. it's very hard to get oppressed minorities to be given their due. >> fareed zakaria, thank you very much. be sure to catch a special edition of "gps" on sunday, focusing on the president's second term. he gets advice on how the president should handle the challenges he'll be facing over the next four years. "memo to the president, roadmap for a second term." it airs sunday night at 8:00 p.m. >>> tomorrow, padma lakshmi is "outfront." the former model who was born in india and spent a lot of time there, she spends a lot of time there and speaks out for the first time about the rape and her country. >> and we're moments away from the biggest college football game of the year. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus severe cold and flu fights your worst flu symptoms, plus that cough. [ sighs ] thanks!... [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer
it's not -- football has nothing to do with it, it's a disgrace. >> let me ask you, in my religion, it's good to suffer some penance in admission of guilt, and then you move on. but when you try to cover something up and you don't confess or accept punishment for it, it stays with you. why doesn't penn state want to get this over with, take their punishment and penalty and get in the huddle and figure out the future? why do they want to go back at this thing when everybody knows they were guilty? >> well, i think penn state probably does want to continue on and get this behind them. and i think it needs to be pointed out this is governor corbett acting independent of penn state. even though he has sat on the board of trustees. listen, chris. i share the skepticism of buzz s bying bissinger about the acts. he has taken a thumping in the polls personally. this litigation might be popular with litigations. one of the reason he's taken such a hurt is people look at him and wonder why as attorney general it took so long for him to move on sandusky. why when he had one credible reporter
in a democracy and say, now we will fix the problems. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic clans are all part of that. you work with the system. i talked about alliances. that is what alliances are important. you work with in those systems. to influence change, affect change. there's so many things going on in the world today that are disgusting, despicable, that we hate. sudan is a good example. we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping change that, people who want to change it. we have limitations. all powers, all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand ho. host: chuck hagel. then-senator barack obama and chuck hagel traveling to the middle east. hagel co talks about the limits of power. guest: one of the conditions that president obama and his team said, a lot of demands and expectations around the world. a lot of challenges. america's role is to not challenge the foes, but to be dependable for the allies. i think one of the real challenges is when you think strategically. when you h
to bear arms in this country and believe it is as core to them as freedom of speech or freedom of religion. i think the laws that are on the books now would not have kept someone like my father from having a gun. we have real issues on mental health that have to be addressed. we are not seeing money put into programs on the books. but i don't understand why anybody needs an assault weapon in this country. i hope that everybody will come to a table. otherwise people are going to go to their corners and fight not seeing what we need to see get done. >> when you see a movement to restrict gun ownership rights, the inevitable outcome is gun sales, magazine sales, ammo sales guthrough the roof. it is the polar opposite intention of what people on debbie's side. argument want to see. >> we saw this before president obam was elected, when hadt looked like he was going to be elected in 2008 and the time period between the inauguration, you see the big jump in gun sales. there has been some degree of... too much concern on the part of gun owners and people said, the president's going to take away a
. connell: think about this and take as you said take religion out of it for a moment because it brings up kind of the wider discussion of how do we use technology to, you know, make us more efficient or even make us safer. we're having all these discussions in schools about after the shooting in connecticut maybe something like this or more technology would be used. but you can't force people to do it, you're saying. >> let me try and crystallize the argument for you, one school of thought is you need to balance safety with freedom. and then freedom will include privacy. another school of thought is safety and privacy are not equal. privacy is the greater good. privacy is a natural right. i can keep myself safe, but i need the government to stay away from me to keep my privacy. there's no balance between them. it's a bias in favor of privacy. the burden should be on the government to prove why this is necessary, not on the defendant, the student, to prove why this is harmful. dagen: but the momentum is toward greater security. >> yes, the government either based on sound reasoning and log
to and resort to their private matters, based on their ritual, that prescribe to their beliefs and religion. >> one of your advisers, speaking of egyptian jews, caused controversy the other day, when he suggested that egyptian jews living in israel should come back to egypt. >> translator: these words were said in a specific context, and the one who said it said it in this way to demonstrate what he wanted to say from his point of view. but there are many media outlets that removed it from the general context. however, he is no longer an adviser to me, because now he is a member of the legislative counsel in the shirra council and hes most likely a leader in this council, and it is not right to group the legislative council and the executive council together in this stage, because he is not my adviser now. cnn correspondent ian lee has been in egypt for several years and speaks arabic. he says there are serious divisions within the country. so talk about those divisions. >> well, on one side, you have the opposition, which in the past, has been unorganized. at this time, against present, th
exercise of religion, applies to these companies that have principles that the owners of these companies have religious convictions and to force or compel someone to violate their conscience is exactly what the free exercise clause of the constitution of the united states was designed to prevent. and this is turned that upside down. i think the obama administration just needs to go back and rewrite their exemptions here. and that would solve this problem. this could be handled administratively. so far the obama administration, president obama's administration has no desire to do that. that's why we're in court. bill: i understand you're looking for delay on this, but meantime us does the company pay the fine? >> they don't have to until the fine is assessed. i used to work with treasury. the question will be when will the actual fine be assessed against the company. that's where i think the department of justice and the department of labor should hold back and wait until the cases are adjudicated. bill: which reached -- >> most of the cases go in our favor, i understand the point you're
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
people here in washington, but the treasury secretary nominee has an extra challenge. his religion. he talked about that with cnn's candy crowley back in 2011, when he was director of the office of management and budget. >> you are an orthodox jew, which means that you can't use electrical devices, over the weekend, friday night sundown to saturday. how does that work in a 24/7 job? have you ever had to cheat? >> well, it's actually not cheating. if there's a matter of real urgency, it is totally consistent with my religious beliefs to do whatever i need to do to deal with it. the hard part is making that judgment of what's an emergency and what's not. what's really serious. and frankly, the hardest part is saying to yourself, that it won't change the outcome if i'm not involved. and i've found that there's an enormous amount of respect, has been from the time i was very young, working for speaker o'neil, from working for two presidents, to taking things that are of real importance seriously. and when the phone rings on saturday, i don't have to wonder whether i need to pick it pup the
-founded -- in the future come up based on a protected category, rape, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. the siv program traditionally, special immigrant visa, usually based on service with the united states. this is something mr. bartlett is a little bit more of an expert on, but congress legislated a program, special immigrant visas, to say that those who have worked for the united states government, there are three subcategories within a special immigrant visa program. initially it was small, a translator with the military but it expanded beyond that to include industry employs. and really for them it's the fact of the service with the united states that makes them eligible. and when they come to the united states, both our agencies -- they don't come with the refugee. they come as a lawful permanent resident xo when they arrived they get a green card. based on their service. now, there are some individuals who may be eligible to apply for both programs. and have worked with the us embassy or the u.s. military so they're eligible to apply fo
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)